John Lennon Friday: Lennon in Heaven II

So this entry is a continuation of the first entry on Linda Keen’s book John Lennon in Heaven.

First, I want to address a thought that’s been rattling in my brain:  secrets.  Everyone has secrets.  Not necessarily bad secrets, sometime just an aspect of our history or our personal life that we do not want to share with the world.

Animal communicators occasionally stumble upon people’s secrets if the people have particularly chatty animals.  An example I’ll give you is a fellow I know whose cat is *really* chatty.  This bright cat shared with me in quick succession his thoughts on “Dad’s new girlfriend,” and the contents of his owner’s fridge, cupboards and what was hidden under his bed.  I was confused about what I saw under the bed and asked for more details, and suddenly realized I’d stumbled on to a secret he was hiding from everyone in his life.  It’s nothing bad or illegal, it just reflects the internal conflict this fellow experiences.

This same fellow has teased me about being psychic, and he declares he won’t believe it until he sees some proof.  I know I could tell him this secret to prove myself, but it would hurt him, and be an incredible violation.  So I keep it to myself, and if he’s open to a reading one day, we’ll find some other proof for him.

It gets sticky for this same reason when I have long conversations with John and his friends.  If I felt a great need to be taken seriously, I could completely spill my guts on everything personal we’ve talked about.  I’d probably turn out a few items of proof for the worst skeptics out there, but I would completely violate the spirit in which this information was shared with me in the first place.

And as I read John Lennon in Heaven, I knew Linda had similar conversations with John that were too personal to include in her book.  I could almost see these unwritten conversations as they were alluded to in the brief paragraphs that touched upon topics of grief, separation and fear.

This is why some people are so uncomfortable with it – “Where’s the proof?” they demand.  Well, the proof is in your intuition, and your emotion, in what strikes your heart as true.  If for you, that’s none of this, that’s okay.

Take what makes sense to you and leave the rest.

I’m just going to go through my page notes here, which were hastily scrawled as I read the book.

My first note is on Brian, his last life being Brian Epstein, manager of the Beatles.  John has brought Brian around our house a couple of times, and always he’s wearing this classy, 50s style blue suit which Linda describes in her book.  In the book, she describes Brian rushing through the tranquil meadow because he’s late for an appointment, but he can’t project himself there because he’s supposed to physically walk and enjoy the journey.  This is so funny, this fellow rushing through heaven, a place where *time does not exist* in the same sense it does for incarnated souls, yet he’s stressing himself out and missing the point of his lesson.

John said precisely the same thing to me about Brian as he’d said to Linda, that Brian has issues to work out with women and that he may need to come back as a “chick” in order to resolve them.

Brian showed up in attendance to the Humanities concert last Friday.  I’ll get into more detail on that experience in a later entry; the short of it is, it was a mind-blowing, face-melting experience.  It turns out we were there to discover a particular new local band – as they set up, John’s voice chattered excitedly in my right ear, “These guys are good!  This is going to be good!”  John began to bring in a few of his friends, one of whom was Brian.

OF COURSE, the band of nineteen year olds covered one of John’s songs (Come Together).  This kind of thing shouldn’t surprise me anymore.  John loved it.  During an interlude, Brian started to talk about how the band could and should market itself.  He said distinctly, “Young men just cannot be expected to dress themselves,” and he shook his head at the band’s dirty jeans with faded underwear showing over the waist.  Brian had said the same thing about the young  Beatles, when he stepped in to manage them.

The first third of Lennon in Heaven is a direct conversation between Linda and John, which is the section that will be most satisfying to the Lennon fan within.  The rest of the book is an intimate detailed account of Linda’s personal spiritual experiences with John.  As you read this keep in mind this journey was transformational for both of them; I think this part of the book makes the most intuitive sense to other people who are on a similar journey.  (Remember no journey is better than another, it’s just that people walking in a similar direction can communicate together more easily.)

Through the described journey, Linda and John confront fear, a consistent theme for myself lately.  I’ve been learning that fear can be a teacher.  While we can be tempted to run screaming from the lesson, fear certainly gets our attention.

The underground caverns she and John explore in this journey to confront fear, there is the recurrence of spiral designs upon the walls.  “It’s the skipping rope,” John said to me as I read this, and I understood that the spiral is another way of describing what Albie explained to me in this entry.  A spiral is just another way of showing the skipping rope, an expression of our reality and the nature of all of creation.

When you manage to get your brain around this concept, however briefly that may be for me, in these moments I understand the irrelevance of fear, thus the need to face fear for what it is – an illusion.  I find this state of understanding difficult to hang on to when I’m completely awake and engaged in my day, but I think I’ll improve with time.

The book approaches the concept of thoughts forming a reality, indeed the reality we experience this very moment.  This another mind-yoga stretch for me.  It is really a different way of explaining the law of attraction and really, another quantum mechanics theory for us ol’ math nerds.

Linda describes her rising awareness, the experience of spending more time with John in Heaven’s lower levels, as something I’d paraphrase as raising her vibration.  Lisa Williams says that when a psychic communicates with a spirit in heaven, she must raise her vibration to hear them and the spirit must lower their vibration to meet in the middle.  When Linda goes into a deep trance and leaves her body for long periods of time in order to meet with John in Heaven, I think the affect of raising her vibration for long periods of time has a cumulative effect on her senses.  She describes her experience as becoming increasingly psychedelic, and how this becomes a new normal state of mind.

It makes sense to me that “psychedelic” is really just the perception of MORE reality around us, not less, not “imaginary” or “made up” (though soon you may begin to think of imagination as something literally creative.)

Here’s something interesting from my own experience – did you know that the world, as seen through the eyes of a chicken, is utterly beautiful?  I described to my friend Toni how the chickens see her garden.  The colours are more vivid, everything is surrounded by beautiful, radiating auras.  Every smell is delicious, the earth is wonderful and satisfying to scratch.  “Psychedelic” is the word I used.

Well Toni wrote to me the other day to say she’d come upon a study that demonstrated that chickens perceive and respond to electromagnetic energy trails.  It helps them find food – they can see the energy trails where the insects and slugs just were.

How dull and grey our own perception of the day-to-day world is in comparison.

To quote John from the book, “All human consciousness is striving towards two basic aims: to accept life for what it is, and to learn how to change.”

Sheesh, you know I have two more pages of notes of things I wanted to blog about, but my brain is getting so tired – and I just got up.  I guess it’s not realistic for me to go over all the points I really appreciated or enjoyed in this book.  If you enjoyed these John Lennon Friday entries, I think it’s safe to say you’ll enjoy Linda’s wonderful book.

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