Tsunami Warning

Long night last night.

There was a significant earthquake off of the north part of the island, and our tsunami sirens went off. People in low-lying communities were asked to move to high ground, so our little household grabbed the essentials and camped out in our car.

Leo, my tabby cat, refused to come with us. Next time, he’ll need to be in a kennel. Sunshine, our white cat, was surprisingly awesome. She hung out in the back window, looking around. She enjoyed herself.

This morning I asked her, “Do you understand why we went in the car last night?”

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Because everyone was scared.

Were you scared?

No, I travel in style.

I don’t know where she learned that. What does that mean, travel in style?

She showed me a queen, showing everybody she is calm and unafraid. That’s Sunshine – royalty. Keep calm, carry on.

When it was determined that our town was not in danger of flooding, we went back home, but we were up until late what with the adrenaline.

So yeah, long night.

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2 thoughts on “Tsunami Warning

  1. Odd, and interesting…. I obviously don’t know y’all…. and have only followed your blog and the items you share on it… but when I read about that Canada-based earthquake in the news, my first thought was of you two, or at least that was the association that happened in my mind. Sort of a “hmmm… I wonder if that’s anywhere near where the ‘physicintraining website’ ladies are”.

    Just something I wanted to share. You were in my thoughts.

    Like

    • Aww, thank you. I appreciate that.

      Yeah, usually once every year or two we seem to get a quake close enough to put everyone on tsunami alert.

      Honestly I was really concerned with this one because it was on a Saturday, the hospital manager and the assistant manager were out of town. I thought, “Yeah, that sounds about right.”

      We do live in a potential inundation zone, but we’re a short way from the evac zone and the hospital. We’d get plenty of advance warning to move out, typically we get at least an hour.

      Alternatively, if there’s a quake strong enough to make it difficult to stand, we’d consider that our 10 minute warning.

      I’m glad we’re far from the east coast right now.

      Like

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